The Christopher Nolan Appreciation Thread

The Oscar Nominated writer and director to whom this site is dedicated.
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Robin wrote:
March 26th, 2018, 4:00 pm
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@TajMahalHotel
The Taj Mahal, New Delhi is proud to have hosted the iconic #ChristopherNolan and his family at Wasabi by Morimoto.

whaaaat! He's already in India?

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Can’t wait to see him in person! This weekend is going to be hella tight!

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ChristNolan wrote:
March 26th, 2018, 5:08 pm
Writer’s beard
Yesssssssssssssssssssssssss :gonf: :gonf: :gonf: :gonf: :gonf: :gonf:


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can't wait to hear cringey shit bollywood pulls in next 3 days

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ChristNolan wrote:
March 26th, 2018, 5:08 pm
Writer’s beard
Finally !


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Photo clicked by: me :D
From 100 feet away :(

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Christopher Nolan puts questions to Al Pacino.
https://www.interviewmagazine.com/film/ ... rospective
CHRISTOPHER NOLAN: How do you achieve a balance between script-based discipline and emotional spontaneity?

PACINO: It depends on the script, but you need to rehearse. As a matter of fact, the strangest thing, the more you rehearse, the more spontaneous you become. It’s the opposite of what people think. Actors who aren’t used to rehearsal will say, “I want to be spontaneous when it comes.” And that’s the way they make most movies now. There’s no rehearsal time. In rehearsal, you can do different things. To give you an example, when [Sidney] Lumet worked on a movie with you, you’d have three weeks to rehearse on that script. Someone once said, “Repetition keeps me green.” There’s a difference between the text when you’re in a room reading it and when you’re out there doing it.

With Sidney, he would say, “Okay, we’ve got this scene, we haven’t quite gotten it. Let’s go work on this thing.” Right there, right on the set. And he has me and the actor improvise…Mainly we were able to do it, because we had been working on it for weeks, maybe months, so we know the people we’re playing a little bit. We did three improvisations that he tapped of the scene. He takes all the data on that, and he translates it and writes one scene from the three improvisations. You know, you don’t do that with the whole script, but at that particular moment, it was a 15 minute scene, that’s what he did. These are the kinds of things that come up…And sometimes you get gold.

NOLAN: You worked multiple times with Sidney Lumet, Francis Ford Coppola, and Brian De Palma. How do you modulate your performance for filmmakers working in such different tones?

PACINO: When I was younger, it was harder for me to understand it. I would be in controversy, conflict. Everybody is different. When you rehearse with the director it helps because you get to know them that way, and you watch what they do. And sometimes you work with someone, and it doesn’t work, but you learn about film. The best way to learn is to do it … Once I started to do my own films, I learned a lot about identifying with the director … It’s all empathy. That’s what it is.

NOLAN: If you had to choose between stage and screen, which and why?

PACINO: I started in theater, so I’m most comfortable in theater. But I’ve done so many films, I’ve gotten comfortable in films. Theater is live. There’s audience feedback, and usually, the text is somewhat more playable for an actor. In the case of Shakespeare, of course, it’s richer so there’s more to do.

NOLAN: Your achievements set a goal for many new actors to aspire to. Was there a level of performance that you were chasing when you became an actor and have you reached it to your own satisfaction?

PACINO: Well, one thing I’ve always done that’s a natural instinct of mine is try not to be hard on myself. I try not to demand stuff of myself. It makes me uncomfortable. One is always looking for the raison d’être, you know? Why am I doing this thing? I’m doing it to engage in something, and every part I play, I’m trying. I’m not neglecting it. And a lot of times, my efforts are not fulfilled, and that has something to do with—it’s a mystery to me. It’s not really connecting to a role in a way that allows—someone else could do that role and all of the sudden it has a new life. It’s all relative.

NOLAN: One of your fellow actors once told me that you would act whatever the circumstances. In the corner of a basement somewhere, you would still be there practicing your art. How would you characterize your need to act?

PACINO: I would say that is exactly what I’ve done. I did that as a youngster. As a teenager, that’s what I did in the streets of New York. I really enjoyed that. I found it fun. Actors don’t work much. You’ve got to be lucky to get in a position to get jobs. So what do actors do if they have an interest in playing roles if they can’t get them? It takes a village to get a part. That’s why I like certain places you can go as an actor, places you find. If you get in, you have a home base there, a place to go to and try things out. I like experimenting, trying things out. When I reflect, that’s what I like to do.

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